How often should you blog? As often as you can without writing shit.

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Since quarantine, folks have been slapping their blogs into hyperdrive and the internet is now getting flooded with just an absurd amount of cruddy content.

The over-zealous are justifying the shit they’re publishing with the old adage that’s been regurgitated to the point of ad nauseam…

“Content is king.”

Here’s why this increase in production could end up fucking them…

The Pre Thing.

There is a direct correlation between quantity and quality. Not just in writing, but in anything.

To use a metaphor, let’s look to track & field.

Steve Prefontaine was fast.

Damn fast.

Widely considered one of the greatest long-distance runners of all time, Steve could run a mile in 3 minutes and 54 seconds.

However, as fast and as great as Steve was, even he saw a drop off in “quality” as he ramped up “quantity”.

When Steve ran 3 miles, he clocked in at 12 minutes and 53 seconds… roughly 35 seconds per mile slower than his 1 mile time.

While still lightning fast and one of the best times on the planet, this difference proves that even top performers see quality diminish (in Pre’s case just by a little) when they ramp up quantity.

It’s worthwhile to look at writing in this same way.

Writers, like runners, experience a drop off in quality as quantity goes up.

We’re witnessing this first-hand from the thought-leaders spewing out broetry on LinkedIn.

As they’re attempting to take advantage of this downtime by putting out more “content”, they’re seeing a massive drop in quality — quality that was already quite bad.

This is why for copywriters, freelancers, marketers, creators and… fuck, even LinkedIn thought-leaders… it’s worthwhile to find your sweet spot.

Finding your sweet spot.

Your writing sweet spot is the quantity of articles you can write each week without seeing a massive drop-off in quality.

I will use myself and Honey Copy as an example.

Below I’ve outlined how the quality of my work diminishes as my quantity increases…

  • 1 article per week… A+
  • 2–3 articles per week… B+
  • 5 articles per week… B
  • 10 articles per week… D

As you can see, my quality diminishes quite a bit from 1 article per week to 3 articles per week… a little from 3 articles per week to 5 articles per week… and substantially from 5 articles per week to 10 articles per week.

As a writer, or really anyone creating anything online, it’s important to take note of how your quantity impacts your quality.

Begin by writing 1 article your first week, 2 your second, 3 your third and so on…

Let them marinate for a few weeks then circle back with a fresh pair of eyes and give them another read through.

Pretend you’re a smart clever reader and objectively ask yourself how you would score each article.

You’ll find there is a drop-off point where articles go from being “good” to being “bad”. Don’t write past this drop-off point.

This is called your sweet spot — the place where you can write “X” number of articles while maintaining a “B” or “good” quality.

I opt for “good” rather than “great” because, in my opinion, it’s better to have 1,000 eyes on a handful of “B” quality articles versus 100 eyes on just 1 “A+” quality article.

So, long story longer.

Writing shitty articles is a good way to make users never want to return to your site again.

How many times have you been on someone’s blog, read an article that sucked harder than a Dyson, and never returned?

Countless.

Your readers aren’t any different.

Save the bullshit for your journal and remember that content is king only if he’s good looking.

By Cole Schafer.

You gotta check this out — Sticky Notes is my email list reserved strictly for entrepreneurs and creatives looking to sell like a Florida Snow Cone Vendor on the hottest day of the year.

Originally published at https://www.honeycopy.com on May 18, 2020.

Written by

I write pretty words and sometimes sell things. https://coleschafer.com/subscribe

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